Commerce Announces Initiation of Inquiry on
Whether Certain Split-Drive Anchors are within the
Scope of the Antidumping Duty Order on Steel
Nails from the People’s Republic of China


August 9, 2017

In a letter issued to interested parties, the Department of Commerce has announced its intention to initiate a formal scope inquiry pursuant to 19 CFR ┬ž 351.225(e) as to whether certain Split-Drive anchors are within the scope of the Antidumping Duty Order on Steel Nails from the People’s Republic of China (A-570-909).

A Split-Drive anchor is a one-piece expansion anchor that can be installed in concrete, grout-filled block and stone. As the anchor is driven in, the split-type expansion mechanism on the working end compresses and exerts force against the walls of the hole. The anchor is made of zinc-plated carbon steel.

Commerce will consider additional written arguments and supporting documentation that interested parties submit within the timeline outlined below. Documents that are not submitted through ACCESS, or otherwise place on the record, will not constitute part of the administrative record attendant to this scope proceeding.

Pursuant to 19 CFR 351.225(f)(l)(iii) comments are due no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on August 27, 2017, and rebuttal comments are due no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on September 6, 2017.  Commerce intends to issue its final determination within 120 days from this initiation, no later than December 5, 2017, as specified in 19 CFR 351.225(f)(5).

For further information or questions about this or other customs issues, please contact George Tuttle, III, at george.tuttle.iii@tuttlelaw.com or 415-986-8780.

 

George R. Tuttle, III is an attorney with the Law Offices of George R. Tuttle in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The information in this article is general in nature, and is not intended to constitute legal advice or to create an attorney-client relationship with respect to any event or occurrence, and may not be considered as such.

Copyright © 2017 by Tuttle Law Offices.  

All rights reserved.  Information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable.  However, because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by our offices or by others, we do not guarantee the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any information and are not responsible for any errors, omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of such information.

 

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